All About Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT)

Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is a type of treatment that combines estrogen and progestin where the body is given hormones to prevent or treat certain medical conditions (such as treating symptoms of menopause in women and preventing osteoporosis). It is prescribed for protection against osteoporosis and heart disease, and relief of menopausal symptoms.

In fact, Hormone replacement therapy is very helpful for preventing osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Age also needs to be considered; women above the age of 60 might not benefit too much from HRT but relatively younger women in their 50s usually respond very well to HRT. Irritating menopausal discomfort reduces greatly. The chances of getting rectal and colon cancer are also reduced. On the whole, HRT is found to be quite useful, since the hormones are important for several tissues. It is a common fear that HRT increases chances of getting breast cancer, but actual studies dismiss the assumption.

Moreover, today Hormone replacement therapy for postmenopausal women has long been the subject of much debate. The long-term use of HRT however remains controversial. Past studies of women taking estrogen for long periods to treat menopausal symptoms led to the recognition that estrogen supplementation can help prevent bone loss in postmenopausal women and thus reduce the risk of osteoporosis.

Therefore, in order to obtain great satisfaction it is necessary for women who choose standard hormone therapy during natural (nonsurgical) menopause typically take estrogen and progestin, a man-made version of progesterone. It can also ease vaginal symptoms of menopause, such as dryness, itching, burning and discomfort with intercourse.